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Little Bird

Little Bird

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By Claudia Ulloa Donoso 

Translated by Lily Meyer

A beautiful, slim book from Bogotá39 member Claudia Ulloa Donoso comprised of magical short stories and texts that explore the strangeness of everyday life.

Publication Date: August 17, 2021

Paperback: 9781646050659

eBook:  9781646050666 

Description

After leaving Peru to pursue graduate school north of the Arctic circle, Claudia Ulloa Donoso began blogging about insomnia. Not hers, necessarily – the blog was never defined as fact or fiction. Her blog posts became the bones of Little Bird, a collection of short stories with the fervent self-declaration of diary entries and hallucinatory haze of sleeplessness. Blending narration and personal experience, the stories in Little Bird stretch reality, a sharp-shooting combination of George Saunders and Samanta Schweblin. Characters real and unreal, seductive, shape-changing, and baffling come together in smooth prose that leaves readers questioning their own truth.

Read an excerpt on Electric Literature

Biographical Note
Claudia Ulloa Donoso has been recognized by critics and readers as one of the most original and surprising voices in Peruvian literature. In 2017, she was included in the Bogotá39, a list of the best Latin American fiction writers under 40 that also includes Valeria Luiselli, Juan Cardenas, and fellow Deep Vellum author Eduardo Rabasa. She currently lives north of the Arctic circle in Bødo, Norway, where she teaches Spanish and Norwegian.

Lily Meyer is a writer and translator from Washington, D.C. She is a regular reviewer for NPR Books, and her criticism appears online in the Atlantic, the New Yorker, the Poetry Foundation, Public Books, and more. Lily is a PhD candidate in fiction at the University of Cincinnati. She is a two-time fiction grant recipient from the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities and won the Sewanee Review Fiction Contest in 2018.